Carroll’s first-time voters make their voices heard at the polls

Carroll%27s+first-time+voters+make+their+voices+heard+at+the+polls

Dwight Burdette, Wikimedia Commons

Matthew Boccella, Staff writer

For some, the 2020 presidential election offered their first opportunity to vote since turning 18. That included some Archbishop Carroll seniors as well as some alums. 

As the pandemic continued through the election, more options for voting were made available. In addition to voting in person, voters in many states were able to mail in their votes and some also allowed early voting, which makde voting much more accessible to people. 

Most of the people who were willing to talk about their opinions were very passionate about what they believed. Few people seemed to be moderate in their beliefs, instead strongly favoring one candidate or the other.

Despite all the different ways of voting, everyone who was asked said that they choose to vote in person instead of mail-in voting. 

This was former Carroll student Danny Reamer’s first election. He decided to vote in person on Nov.3 because he was suspicious of the mail-in voting. 

On Wednesday, Reamer said, “I … went with my mom yesterday morning and voted for Trump and all other Republican candidates for local elections.”

Reamer said he voted for Trump because the president “… restored our economy, dropped unemployment (especially helping minorities).” 

Carroll senior Andrew Ranaudo cast his vote for Trump, too.

“I voted for Donald Trump in person because he is a great president and a great leader,” Ranaudo said.

Carroll senior Samantha Vassallo said she voted in person after school Tuesday. She voted blue because of “Trump’s handling of the Covid-19 and his stance on immigration.

“Biden has a plan for free/cheaper healthcare and has a plan for fixing climate change,” Vassallo said.

Some students weren’t willing to say for whom they cast their ballots. Among them was Carroll senior Jason McNally.  

“Yeah, I voted in person last night in the town hall I have,” McNally said Wednesday. “I don’t want to tell anybody who I voted for, though.”